What Are The Different URL Patterns In Figpii?

FigPii allows you to use URL patterns across the platform to specify different pages you want to run an experiment on or different goal pages. 

Targeting specific page: If you want your experiment to run on several pages of your site, then you will use a URL pattern to identify these pages. Any time a visitor visits one of these pages identified by the URL pattern, FigPii will serve them one of the variations in the test. 

Goal pages: If the goal of your experiment is to check how many users access several pages of your site, then you will use a URL pattern to identify these pages. Any time a visitor visits one of these pages (after viewing a test page), then a conversion will be recorded.

URL Patterns in FigPii

Exact Match

This pattern looks for any string or substring match exactly the URL you input.

Starts With

This pattern looks for any string or substring match at the beginning of your page URL. For example, if you specify the URL "Starts With" type and type the URL string as http://www.mysite, FigPii will track for the URLs http://www.mysite.com/blog/, http://www.mysite.com/blog/first-post, http://www.mysite.com/blog/second-post, and so on.

Contains

This pattern looks for any string or substring match in the page URL. If you select "contains" as the URL type, the page must contain the string of the substring you enter. For example, if you specify the URL "contains" type and type the URL string as http://www.mysite.com/blog, FigPii will track for the URLs http://www.mysite.com/blog/first-post, http://www.mysite.com/blog/second-post, and so on.

Regular Expression

Select the Regular Expression URL match type to use wildcards and special characters to match the structure of your website. Using Regular Expressions (Regex), you can specify a set of pages on which the test should run.

Simple Match

This pattern looks for any and all URLs that include the phrase or symbol supplied here. for example, if all your product pages include the phrase "Product" in their URL then you can fill in this part with the phrase " Product" and they will all be targeted.

Query key

Some URLs may contain stuff after ? for example, https://www.example.com/s/?search=shape+solver&usr=1Values before = are called query keys ( search and usr here) and values after = are called query values (they are optional, sometimes just the key is present). Key/value pairs are separated with & So in this URL you have two key/value pairs: search -> shape+solver and usr -> 1

Custom Page Key

Sometimes there is no way to distinguish between page types just by URL. So, in this case, you may want to add a code snippet to the pages you want to target so FigPii can distinguish between those and the other pages. For example, you want to target category pages, so on your site, you insert window.FIGPII_MPK = 'category'; inside JS code on category pages, then set the targeting rule to the "Custom Page Key" -> "category".

Subdomain (exact match)

If your experiment is going to run on pages that have a Subdomain other than www, then you need to specify them here.

  • What is a Subdomain? A subdomain is, as the name would suggest, an additional section of your main domain name. You create subdomains to help organize and navigate to different sections of your main website. Within your main domain, you can have as many subdomains as necessary to get to all of the different pages of your website.
    Here's an example to give you a better visual. Let's say you sell refrigerators at your main webpage, isellrefrigerators.com. If you sell your fancy food coolers online, you need to have an ecommerce store. This should be a part of your main website, which will then require a subdomain. The URL for your web store then becomes store.isellrefrigerators.com. Therefore, the store is your subdomain, while "isellrefrigerators" is your main domain. The .com is your top-level domain.
    You can actually use any text you'd like as your subdomain, but it's in your best interest to make it something that's easy for users to type and remember. (Source)

 

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